Author Archives: Jeff Gallagher

Saying Goodbye

You may have heard by now that former Orange County Sheriff, Sandra Hutchens, passed away a few days ago. Hutchens, the third female sheriff in California and the first in Orange County, was 66 at her passing. Current Sheriff Don Barnes wrote an eloquent press release of admiration and respect, calling her a mentor and friend. “She led the department with courage, grace and dignity.”

Sheriff Hutchens took office in a time of strife and crisis in the OCSD. The former sheriff had been tried and convicted of federal charges of witness tampering, stemming from a year long investigation of corruption in the department. The department, to say the least, was left tattered and worn.

Hutchens was appointed for the remainder of the term and went to work immediately to repair the damage done by her predecessor(s). She made substantial changes to the department that left many conservatives wondering about her ability to lead. She was, after all, a product of a liberal Los Angeles County law enforcement agency. But, she was determined to restore the honor and dignity of the deputies who worked for her.

When the federal courts found in favor of the gun-toting crowd in 2014 (Peruta vs. San Diego), Hutchens complied by relaxing the standards for which a concealed weapons permit would be issued. She gained further favor and respect with the conservative crowds when, after the courts overturned the initial order, she left the looser standards in place.

Hutchens’ instincts helped her give the department direction and purpose again. She made changes to the jails to keep prisoners and deputies safer and more accountable. She brought the department into the 21st century regarding the use of electronic databases for record keeping – records that could not be altered. She withstood attacks from the DA’s office and criticism from the Board of Supervisors. Where there was praise, it went to staff; when there was criticism, she readily took the blame. She had high ethical standards and expected the same for those who worked for her.

I met Sheriff Hutchens when she first took office in 2008. I was a board director of the union that represented the sheriffs special deputies and most civilian employees of the department. I found her to be affable, intelligent and respectful of others. She was genuinely interested in the welfare of her employees and it showed. Her demeanor commanded respect, not fear. I liked her.

Sheriff Hutchens retired in 2019 I think due mostly to her long standing battle with breast cancer. She was diagnosed in 2012 and she successfully fought it into remission. She successfully ran for two terms as Sheriff, choosing not to run for a third. Unfortunately, cancer became the ultimate winner and, after a brief relapse, she succumbed to the disease over the weekend.

OC Sheriff Don Barnes said, “She restored our pride, gave us back our dignity and rebuilt trust with the people we serve. She kept her oath, kept her promises, and ended her time in office leaving this agency better than when she started.”

I agree. RIP, Sheriff.

Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Holidays and a Prosperous NewYear

ireland703Mele Kalikimaka ame Hauoli Makahiki Hou! Nollaig chridheil agus Bliadhna mhath ùr! Milad Majid! Feliz Navidad! Merry Keshmish! Idah Saidan Wa Sanah Jadidah! Heughliche Winachten un ‘n moi Nijaar! Glædelig Jul! Cristmas-e-shoma mobarak bashad! Shinnen omedeto. Kurisumasu Omedeto! Chuc Mung Giang Sinh! Merry Christmas.

All of us at Our Town Tustin (yes, that is all seven of us if you count the livestock) would like to wish our Christian friends, a very Merry Christmas, our Jewish friends, a very Happy and belated Hanukkah, and our friends of other faiths and belief traditions a very Happy Holiday. And, to everyone, we wish you a Happy and Prosperous New Year.

What started out as a year of promise and prosperity has become, over the months, a struggle to overcome the adversity caused by a tiny bug no one can see. After more than eight months of isolation, shortages and loss of jobs and income, we seem to be at the bottom. Yet, it is amazing to see how resilient our America is. With the advent of Christmas has also, with the coming vaccine,  come another advent of a brighter year ahead.

Through it all, we have seen some amazing acts of kindness and care. Our own Tyron Jackson and his OWW organization of volunteers have made sure many of our homeless and otherwise forgotten members of our local society have felt some normalcy and sense of decency in their lives. The social media app, Next Door, is replete with stories of individuals and groups who, many for the first time, are reaching out to others in need with kindness and care packages. Our church food drives have not stopped despite the come-and-go ban on attending services. Indeed, many have stepped up their efforts because they know that this is a trying time for many who have never experienced this kind of need before.

Though we still grieve for families torn apart by senseless violence, our nation, state and town remain united in promise and faith. And, please pray for our US Military members who remain abroad in far away lands. They spend this holiday season away from their loved ones so that you and I may spend it with ours.

Foley’s In – The Republicans are Screwed

So, a week or so ago, I was writing about how failed….uh, I mean former state senator, John Moorlach, had come home to roost in the 2nd Supervisorial District of Orange County. Moorlach who, if nothing else espouses self-confidence and possesses the ego of a caesar, has been busy convincing others that he is the best person for the position. His competition, curiously, was primarily from his own Republican party in the form of Newport Beach City Councilman, Kevin Muldoon and Huntington Beach Councilman, Mike Posey. Moorlach has been successful in warding off two other contenders, convincing them he is the best man for the job. Muldoon and Posey aren’t impressed.

Even so, Moorlach seemed the likely winner in a three way race between them. After all, he has name recognition and, as he likes to remind everyone, the experience.

Yes, Katrina Foley, Costa Mesa Mayor and Democrat, did file papers to run for the seat. But what Democrat would challenge what has been a staunch conservative seat since the turn of the last century? There have been more than a few elections for the seat, in years since, that went unopposed. Democrats haven’t bothered because the district is comprised of some of the most conservative portions of Orange County.

But the time are changing…..and so is Orange County

So, maybe that is why Foley has dropped her hat into the ring. And, she has received the blessings of the OC Democratic Party as well. Foley, the first directly elected mayor of Costa Mesa is no stranger to a fight with Republicans. In 2018, she was removed as mayor when conservative councilmen Jim Righeimer and Alan Mansoor garnered the support of previous ally, Sandy Genis to boot her from the position. Genis had mud on her face (and I would say lost a friend) when Foley walloped her in the 2018 mayor’s race, garnering over 52% of the vote.

Foley has been a Costa Mesa City Councilwoman for more than 10 years. She has a long history of community service and she is an attorney who owns her own law corporation. That corporation handles contracts and business litigation for high profile clients, an area of experience that would serve her well at the county level. To say professionally she is a threat to John Moorlach, is an understatement. She also has name recognition in the county. That makes her a very real threat to any Republican.

But, will it be enough to win? Surely, with Muldoon and Posey pulling votes from Moorlach, it could be. Muldoon and Posey both say they have a strong following in their own cities. And, although the Democrats have a slight edge in Orange County overall, they lag behind by 5 points in the district. And, according to the Voice of OC, had an even larger turnout in the recent election. If they can rally the troops, or better yet get Posey and Muldoon to drop out, Moorlach will likely win. The question is, just how tired are the voters?

Can We Please Get a Procedure?

First, it was Letitica Clark’s first official meeting of the city council as Mayor or Tustin. I think she did, and will continue to do, a fine job as Mayor for the coming year. I will say that she needs to take more command of the “room”, however. This isn’t her first rodeo and she knows how to lead. She just needs to do it a bit more decisively. Don’t let these guys intimidate you. You are in charge (ceremonially, of course).

That said, one item on the council agenda took up the most time and I’m left wondering why. You see it turns out that, what I thought was a regular procedure, was really just the good old boys on the council doing what they do best. And, there really is no regular procedure at all.

If you watched the city council meeting the other night, you know that I am talking about the selection process for upcoming vacancies for our various city commissions. In years past, I remember the council selecting an ad hoc committee to winnow the applicant pool to a realistic few and then presenting their recommendations to the full council. I just assumed it was a procedure set in stone. It isn’t.

So, for 30 minutes (of a 53 minute meeting), the city council wallowed around on Zoom kicking back and forth several suggestions from a staff report on how to proceed. In contrast, it took the 2018 city council, under Mayor Chuck Puckett, a little over 2 minutes to decide this process. In that time, Puckett also appointed two members to the ad hoc committee who would eventually present their findings to the council.

I realize that then Mayor Puckett has over 25 years of experience to guide him in how to handle what should be a routine matter. But the fact is, three of the current city council members -including the mayor- were on the council back then. Maybe they should’ve taken notes. Councilman Cooper’s desire to establish a participation trophy for all the applicants aside, the discussion took entirely too long.

No, no one wants their feelings hurt when they don’t get selected. Yes, everyone gets stressed over the interview and selection process. But, if you can’t handle the stress of an interview, then you certainly shouldn’t be handling city business. And all the millennial jokes aside, most of us can handle disappointment. We don’t need a feel good pat on the back for trying. So, what’s the problem? Why do we need to have a 30 minute discussion on how to proceed?

This is a process that should have been codified long ago. And it is certainly overdue now. Even back in 2017, then city councilman Al Murray called the ad hoc committee process, “the system we have in place.” As long as I have been writing this blog, the city has used the same process. And, while I may have had some trepidation in the past about how “the system” worked, it is a good system. As Councilman Lumbard remarked, interviewing 30 people is time consuming and stressful for everyone. Having a sub-committee to thin the applicant pool is the best method to deal with that.

It would seem the city council eventually agreed as the ad hoc committee (members of which Clark failed to nominate at the time) process will be used….again.

So, maybe the mayor, as one of her goals, could use this to have the process codified rather than having to have this debate every other year? I’m sure she could make use of our city attorney to write a properly worded citation to adopt.