Category Archives: In the News

Another Election? Well, Yeah…..

cant fix stupidWe’re in for it now. If you haven’t been keeping up with the cutthroat politics of Orange County, the latest folks to announce candidacy for office are former OC Board of Supervisor and fortuneteller extraordinaire, John Moorlach and conservative-but-approachable-by-Democrats, 68th District Assemblyman Don Wagner. They are, of course, vying for Mimi Walters’ seat. Walters has since left for the bright lights of Washington.

Wagner has served in the Assembly since 2010 and sits on several key committees, including the Public Employees, Retirement and Social Security, Revenue and Taxation and Judiciary where he serves as Vice-Chair. And, although Wagner did not receive the endorsement of the OC Republican Party, his rating on the California Republican Assembly is 94% and he received the 2014 endorsement.

Moorlach, on the other hand, has been hashing through Orange County in his typical systematic fashion. In fact, Moorlach’s campaign slogan says it all: “Focused and Understandable”. With Moorlach, though, it ought to be “Focused and Boring”, as that is what it is like to listen to him plod on about any issue he may be talking about.

john-moorlach

John Moorlach

Moorlach, who at one time stated that he had no intention of making a career of politics, spent most of the last year exploring runs for Lt. Governor, Congress and a few local offices before settling on the Senate for his next career move. And, now that he has settled on our district, he is wasting no time seeking and obtaining coveted endorsements.

While the CRA gave a high rating to Don Wagner, it was Moorlach who got the local CRA Unit’s endorsement. I’m not sure what that amounts to in votes, considering the whole Orly Taitz-Deborah Pauly (I’m still banned from her Twitter account) Orange County bunch. So, is the CRA local unit endorsement worth much? And what other endorsements does Moorlach have besides his old bedfellow, Shawn Nelson? We really don’t know because, Moorlach’s campaign website doesn’t list his endorsements.

On the other hand, Wagner proudly shows off his list. And, while it may not contain anyone on the Lincoln Club list of who’s-who, it is certainly impressive (if you’re impressed by that sort of thing). The list does include both Tony Rackauckas and Sheriff Sandra Hutchens. It’s interesting that the two other chief (and public safety) elected officials in the county both nixed the pedantic Moorlach for Wagner. Looking back on Moorlach’s eight years in office, it’s easy to see why.

Don Wagner

Don Wagner

Along with those high power endorsements comes a slew of local elected officials from around the county including 37 local officials and 27 state elected officials, many from local districts. Both U.S. Representatives Ed Royce and Mimi Walters, whose senate seat these two are vying for, have endorsed Wagner.

Along the popular lines (face it, even endorsers only get one vote), Wagner wins hands down. Moorlach’s Facebook page shows a whole 621 likes. Wagner has a handy 2400 likes. Some of those who like him include TUSD Board Member, Jonathan Abelove and FCA procurator Richard Nelson. I’ll give them both points for keeping their Facebook pages current.

Likewise on Twitter. Both candidates are maintaining a presence but Wagner outguns Moorlach with over 1658 followers. Wagner also has twice the number of tweets and followers as Moorlach. Moorlach’s latest tweets are about his recent podcast on OC Talk Radio. Don’t get all excited, now. OCTR is an internet only show that I reported on previously. Our own Jerry Amante also hosts a show there.

Among other things he talks about is how he single-handedly led Orange County out of the bankruptcy (I kid you not). He also mentions how desirable it is to work in The Real OC – sure, if you are a government official and not a rank-and-file county employee. Yes, his conversation is based in the ethernet and has no basis in reality. But, you can say anything on (internet) radio, right? What he doesn’t mention is his effort to extend his term(s) on the OC Board of Supes with his failed endorsement of Measure N. He also attempted an end run by getting his fellow board members to go along with a similar measure. Not even his buddy Shawn went along.

Then, there is the Rossmoor debacle….

What it really comes down to is, who would be the best representative of our interests in the California Senate? Unfortunately, we have no Democrat (unless you count the idiot from Huntington Beach who is running as a write-in candidate), (little l) libertarian, or green party candidates running. It’s been a given, perhaps falsely , that our district is solid Republican. I think that ground is slowly giving way.

And, perhaps that is what Don Wagner sees. He has been accused by the ultra-conservatives of not being “Red” enough. He actually takes a more liberal line on such issues as immigration reform and pensions. And, God knows, he actually took campaign money from a police union in direct violation of the mystical Scott Baugh Manifesto (along with Janet Nguyen, whose “secret” campaign contributions from OCEA are famous).

But, he also has the respect of and influence with many legislators, both Republican and Democrat. He knows how to cross the aisle to get the job done. If you are a Democrat or even a liberal thinking Republican, doesn’t it make sense to work with the other side rather than toe the line just because?

With Moorlach, who has an ethics problem when it comes to his own pension, you don’t get any of this. No experience, not even popularity. He couldn’t make up his mind what he wanted to run for until he found something he could afford (because he knew he’d have trouble raising campaign funds). He refused to give up his pension while making county employees out to be union thugs for not giving up theirs. He falsely claims to have repaired the bankruptcy when, in reality, he did nothing more than foretell what many already knew – and what many argue would not have occurred if the county had waited a few more days (we’ll never know, will we?).

Clearly, Moorlach’s methodical approach appeals to the rich and powerful in the county. He has spent his entire career schmoozing with the elite. He has blocked the formation of ethics commissions. He has wasted millions of dollars in ridiculous IT contract escalations with no viable results, all in the name of “public-private” partnerships that haven’t worked.

The choice between a career, professional politician with an eye toward progress and that of a pedantic, condescending and unethical dilettante is obvious. The special election for the California State Senate District 37 will be held March 17, 2015. Sample ballots have been mailed and absentee ballots (oh, when will they combine them?) should be out soon.

This will be another special, low-turnout election that will be decided on by the absentees. With three Republicans and a write-in candidate, it is quite likely no one will receive the requisite 51 percent and we will be subjected to a subsequent election in May. Do your part to see that doesn’t happen by voting for Don Wagner.

It’s In The Bag

Kids, Don't Try This at Home

Kids, Don’t Try This at Home

Ah, yes, I still hear them cheering when Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the first-in-the-nation statewide ban on plastic bags. Saying, “We’re the first to ban these bags and we won’t be the last,” Brown crowed that it was the miracle cure that would clear our landfills and beaches of the noxious bags.

I hate ‘em. Plastic bags, I mean. They are not environmentally friendly and are a threat to wildlife. My wife and I do our best to bring our own bags to the store when we shop. It doesn’t always work out, though. Sometimes, we miscalculate and wind up with a mix of our own and the plastic thingies from Albertsons. And, paper bags would be better all around.

And, up until recently, it looked like we were all headed in the same direction come this July 1st, whether we liked it or not. That was the scheduled date of implementation for major grocery stores and pharmacies to comply with the law by getting rid of plastic bags. Of course, they could still offer you a paper store bag.

That paper bag would cost you ten cents, however. My wife and I found out how this works last year when we took a road trip to Petaluma (don’t ask). On the way, we stopped at a San Francisco Trader Joes. After marveling at the escalator just for shopping carts, we shopped for groceries. On checkout, the cashier asked for our bags.

“Bags?” I mumbled. “We didn’t know….”,  shuffling my feet and thinking we would have to carry out the groceries in our hands. Not to worry. The kindly cashier was happy to produce a bag – at the cost of ten cents. Thus, we were introduced to the San Francisco local bag ban.

Now, it looked like what was good for San Francisco, Huntington Beach and a host of other cities in and out of Orange County, would be good for the entire state.

That is, until the plastic bag manufacturers got together and collected signatures. Enough signatures -over 800,000- were gathered within the time frame and submitted to the state. The state has certified the referendum and it will now appear on the 2016 ballot.

This particular law has local ramifications, of sorts. Durabag Company Incorporated, is located in Tustin, off Redhill and Edinger. It is a small business by most standards but they have been around awhile and they employ a number of people in the manufacture of plastic bags and paper materials. According to a press release last year, Durabag joined several other local bag manufacturers in a “Bag the Ban” alliance to squelch the bill prior to enactment. According to the alliance, 2,000 jobs are at stake.

Well, I suppose sacrifices have to be made although I wouldn’t necessarily include jobs of mostly lower-middle class workers in that. Yes, durabag (and probably the other manufacturers) produce other goods, notably paper bags and boxes. But, there would still likely be some loss.

Then, there is the ten cent a paper bag tax fee incentive to bring your own bags. I suspect that, unless you are already environmentally prone to supplying your own bags, a user fee is not going to do much to coerce you. And, there is the question as to whether the ban really works. If it does, why are a host of cities who enacted local bag ban ordinances now contemplating repeal?

Our own Huntington Beach, saw their city council chamber filled with supporters and detractors in a January meeting. Their ban could be lifted in May if some councilmembers have their way. Other cities in California and across the nation (in cities a lot more environmentally conscious than ours) are considering the same move to repeal their bag bans.

In any case, it looks like we are safe from the statewide bag ban for now. With the Secretary of State’s certification of signatures, the issue is headed to the voters in 2016. It is anyone’s guess whether the law will be overturned. And, even if it is, other cities could join the more than 100 California communities that have enacted local ordinances to ban plastic bags.

Could Tustin be on that list?

Veterans Need Not Apply (Or Die)

Veterans-CemeteryTuesday’s Planning Commission meeting has been cancelled for lack of interest agenda items. That doesn’t mean we can’t have a meeting, however. Don’t forget, the Parks and Recreation Commission is holding a design forum for a veterans memorial this afternoon beginning at 4:30 pm in the city council chambers. It should be interesting to see how many show up on a Monday afternoon a half hour before the normal close of a business day. Thanks for the planning, staff.

Wed to the idea of a Veterans Memorial at the appropriately renamed Veterans Memorial Park, is a veterans cemetery for Orange County. Initially proposed by veterans and opposed by NIMBYs, then assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva was instrumental in bringing legislation that would pave the way for a veterans cemetery “somewhere” in Orange County.

That “somewhere”, of course was a plot of land on the former MCAS base now being bulldozed for subdivisions and not-so-great parks. a 105 acre parcel of land has been identified on the property to be developed as a potential final resting place for the county’s many veterans who have settled here.

It didn’t take long, however, for the opposition to rear its collective ugly head. What was surprising is the tactic they took.

As far back as October of last year, a local blog urged the city of Irvine to relocate the proposed cemetery anywhere but…..Irvine. Well, OK, they just didn’t want it next to their house as they had paid lots of money for their property and they were afraid a veterans cemetery would lower their home value. But, except for cool places like Musick Honor Farm and alleged contamination near proposed high schools, Irvine is mostly neighborhoods. And parks. And technology centers.

On the Talk Irvine forum, one of the discussions which appeared last year, was on the location of the veterans cemetery. That discussion, begun in July of last year has recently been renewed with the appearance of an anti-veterans cemetery petition. The pro and anti cemetery discussion has mostly centered around Feng-Shui, Asian Culture and….property values. And, while many of the contributors have supported the building of a veterans cemetery, quite a few thank the veteran in one sentence and then, in the same sentence, denounce the idea of a final resting place for them.

Another Irvine blog, run by and for the Asian community, also makes a deal out of Asians, housing and cemeteries. This blog could be largely discounted as other blog entries clearly mark it as a special interest section.

Now, it seems, there is a petition circulating in Irvine that would set signatures to paper in an effort to stop the project. We were unable to obtain a copy of the petition but our friends at The Liberal OC did.

The petition relies on scare tactics and misinformation to lure people into signing it. Among other misleading statements the petition says:

2. ….Most of the residents lived (sic) next to the cemetery are Asians. In Asian culture it is taboo to place a cemetery next to homes or close to urban area (sic).

While the “taboo” issue is debatable, what is not debatable is the fact that the largest Vietnamese community in the United States lives in and around (and also utilizes) Westminster Memorial Park. In fact, one section of the park is dedicated to the Asian community and specifically respects their culture.

3. Many Irvine residents did not know about this cemetery until October, 2014.

Well, the proposed cemetery has been in the works for several years, thanks to The American Legion District Commander, Bill Cook, and others. It was in the news and there were meetings, including a meeting with the author of the Bill authorizing the cemetery Sharon Quirk-Silva. In fact, it was hard not to hear something about it.

4. In the next 100 years, the development of the west Coast (sic) of the United States will be largely supported by the Asian investment and immigrants.

Really? So, Latin America and Europe will have less influence than Asia? While we all drive Asian cars, this statement is a bit presumptuous. But, say it was true. Does anyone honestly think the Chinese won’t invest in California, indeed the entire west coast, because there is a veterans cemetery in Irvine?

5. The cemetery will drive down home values and increase blight.

So, according to the petition authors, the Cypress-Los Alamitos-Rossmoor area is blighted because of Forest Lawn Cypress. North Santa Ana is blighted because they have two cemeteries across the street from each other. Orange Park Acres is blighted with low house prices due to Holy Sepulcher Cemetery, a double whammy because its run by the dreaded Roman Catholic Diocese. Even Corona del Mar property values have been drug down by the Pacific View Memorial Park because it is smack in the middle of their high-end housing. Wow. Who knew?

The petition closes by stating the proposed cemetery is in the wrong location because it is too close to homes, a high school and the urban center [I kid you not],veterans cemetery and at a highly populated area.

They go on to offer their help in “finding a better location to create a win-win situation.”

Newsflash, Irvine petition writer and your allies – There is no better location than a former Marine Air Base with deep ties (much deeper and longer than the Asian community) to Orange County. The El Toro Marine Base saw hundreds of thousands of veterans of every branch of service pass through its gates over the years. There is a fierce pride among the residents, veteran or not, in that legacy.

The petition author(s) talk about disrespect to the Asian community. What about the disrespect shown to the veterans through the circulation of this petition? As Sharon Quirk-Silva said on her Facebook Page, “Everyone is entitled to their own opinion….. To say that a veteran cemetery will cause blight is disrespectful.”

Veterans (including myself) have fought long and hard to establish a cemetery within the boundaries of Orange County. There are only two suitable locations for a cemetery, in my opinion. It’s unfortunate Tustin has chosen to haggle over a baseball stadium rather than a cemetery. They’d probably have a better chance of securing the latter.

I won’t pull the, “if you don’t like it, leave” card. I will say, let the majority prevail. In the current scenario, that looks like the pro-cemetery folks. Don’t worry, though. The cemetery is a long way from having the first hero buried there. You’ll have plenty of time to get used to it – or move.

Veterans Memorial Forum Scheduled

Save the Date Keep February 9, 2015 open, especially if you are a veteran. The Parks and Recreation Department has sent out a press release announcing a “Veterans Memorial Design Forum” to be held in the Tustin City Council Chambers at 4:30 pm that day.

According to the press release:

This is an opportunity to provide input on the proposed Veterans Memorial to be constructed at the future 31.5 acre Veterans Sports Park (assuming the city council approves the name change) later this summer.

Tustin has a long and personal history with the military. It is unfortunate that our leaders of late have little to do with that history. While I won’t say anyone has disrespected the military presence there has been little, aside from the monthly Presentation of the Colors by The American Legion Post 227, to promote our history. This memorial is long overdue and, judging from the number of veterans, Blue Star and Gold Star families in the area, it is something our town deserves to have.

Our current memorial sites consist of a simple flagpole and plaque on the corner of Prospect and 1st Street, nestled in the corner of a childcare building. ErectedTustin War Memorial originallyt in 1958 and updated in the ’70’s, it has long been neglected, even by those who know of its existence. The memorial lists casualties of World War II and the “Forgotten War” (Korea). How many of our men and women have been lost to later wars?

It is important that the city understand this memorial needs to come from the hearts of the citizens that live here and not bureaucratic government hack, most of whom do not live in the city. Any memorial should be a tribute to the armed forces, primarily the USMC, who have been killed in service to their country. At the same time, it should honor the dead and those still unaccounted for in all of our wars.

If you are a veteran or the family of a veteran, it is imperative you attend this meeting or contact the city with your opinion on the memorial. You can bet they already have a design in mind. It is up to us to make sure our fallen brothers and sisters are honored in a manner befitting our heritage.

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